Bio-Psychosocial-Spiritual Assessment

Rationale behind a BPSS, sample questions, BPSS templates


This page has three sections:

  1. Background Material that provides the context for the topic

  2. A suggested Practice Approach

  3. A list of Supporting Material / References

Feedback welcome!

Background Material


BPSS Assessment is designed to give the social worker sufficient background to formulate a plan for the person, going-forward. Undertaking a BPSS assessment prior to looking at treatment options can be very useful in uncovering aspects of the service user’s life that may have remained hidden if problem solving commenced without the BPSS.


A BPSS assessment examines the biological, psychological, social and spiritual factors that impact on a person’s life. The following outline from the University of Nevada provides some idea of what information can be gathered, and the types of questions that can be used. Depending on the area of practice, social workers may choose to emphasise one or more of the four areas of the assessment and will, over time, develop their own approach to the BPSS.


[University of Nevada, Reno. School of Medicine. (n.d.). Bio-Psycho Social-Spiritual Model. Retrieved September 21, 2020, from https://med.unr.edu/psychiatry/education/resources/bio-psycho-social-spiritual-model]


Biological

Past

Genetics:

  • Consider whether any blood relatives that have had psychiatric problems, substance use problems or suicide attempts/suicides.

History of Pregnancy and Birth:

  • Consider pregnancy variables: Was there in-utero exposure to nicotine, alcohol, medications or substances? Anything unusual about pregnancy?

  • Note birth complications, such as prematurity, birth trauma or extended periods of hospitalization.

Relevant Previous Illnesses


Present

Current Illnesses:

  • Identify current illnesses and any direct impact they may have.

Medications:

  • Assess current medication regimen. Consider possible side effects of current medications.

Substances:

  • Consider the influence of nicotine, alcohol and street drugs on current psychiatric symptoms.

  • Consider the possible effects of substance withdrawal.

Psychological

Past

  • Comment on any past history of trauma, as well as resiliency.

  • Consider the sources of positive self-image and positive role models.

  • Comment on the patient's experience with loss.

  • Comment on the patient's quality of relationships with important figures, such as grand parents, friends, significant teachers, or significant employers.

Present

  • Describe the recent events and experiences that precipitated the admission or appointment.

  • What are the current stressors? Do they have any symbolic meaning?

  • Assess and comment on coping skills, defense mechanisms, presence or absence of cognitive distortions.

  • Consider current developmental demands on the person, such as marriage, divorce, birth, children leaving home, loss, aging, etc. What stage of development is the patient at now? Is it appropriate?

Social

  • How adequate is the patient's current support system?

  • What is the current status of relationships with important figures?

  • What are the possible peer influences?

  • Consider the patient's current housing arrangement.

  • Comment on vocational/financial status.

  • Comment on any relevant legal problems.

  • Consider the role of agencies (e.g. Veteran's Administration, Child Protective Services, Criminal Justice System) on the patient.

  • Comment on cultural influences that may impact the current situation and that might impact treatment.

Spiritual


· Comment on the role of spirituality in the patient's life.

· How does spirituality contribute to the patient's ability to hope, their position on suicide if relevant, or their contact with a supportive community?


Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual Model: Examples of Kinds of Questions to ask During your Interviews


When you conduct your diagnostic interviews, you will want to compile information that will allow you to address the components of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual model. It is good to start with open-ended questions in each section, narrowing to closed-ended questions if the open-ended questions do not elicit the relevant material.


Biological

Past

Genetics:

  • Tell me about any family history of psychiatric problems or suicide attempts.

  • Tell me about any relatives that have been hospitalized for psychiatric masons. Tell me about any relatives that might have suffered from emotional problems. How were they treated and how did they respond to these treatments?

History of Pregnancy and Birth:

  • Tell me about your mother's pregnancy with you. Do you know if she smoked, drank, or used any medications?

  • What have you been told about your actual birth? Were there any birth complications?

Relevant Previous Illnesses:

  • Tell me about any major medical problems you have had in your life. Have you had any history of head injury, endocrine disorders (i.e. thyroid, adrenal), seizures, malignancies or neurological illnesses?

Present

Current Illnesses:

  • Can you describe your health right now? Do you have any illnesses right now? Do you worry that you have something that has not been diagnosed?

Medications:

  • Tell me about the prescribed and non-prescribed medications that you are taking? (Probe for medications that have psychoactive effects, such as steroids, beta blockers, pain medications, benzodiazepines, SSRI's, Herbal remedies).

Substances:

  • Can you tell me about your use of alcohol or take street drugs? (Probe for whether current substance use could account for patient's psychiatric symptoms).

Psychological

Past

  • How were you treated as a child? (Probe for trauma as well as evidence for family strengths).

  • Can you tell me about any trauma's you might have experienced in life? (Probe for military/combat, rape, violence, and serious illness).

  • Can you describe to me any losses you have experienced? How did you cope with this?

  • Tell me about your relationships like with important figures, such as parents, grandparents, friends, significant teachers, or significant employers.

  • How have medical problems or psychiatric problems in your past influenced your life today?

Present

  • Tell me about the recent events and experiences that bring you here today?

  • How have you already tried to solve your problems? (Probe for coping skills).

  • How do you usually cope with difficult life-situations? (Probe for and observe defense mechanisms).

  • Tell me about how you are coping with marriage, divorce, birth, children leaving home, loss aging, etc. (The point here is to get a sense of what is being demanded of the person at this time, developmentally).

  • How do current medical problems or psychiatric problems influence your life today?

Social

  • Tell me about who you tum to if you need help. Do you have friends or family you can turn to if you need help?

  • Tell me about who you rely on for company, support, and fun. Do you have friends or family that you can rely on for company, support, and fun?

  • Currently, describe the kind of social life that you have? How often do you get together with people you can relate to, and do you enjoy it?

  • When you were feeling better, describe the kind of social life you had. How often did you get together with people you could relate to?

  • Tell me about your present housing arrangement? Are you satisfied with it?

  • Tell me about your work life. Are you working? Is your work satisfying or do you need help in this area?

  • Tell me about your financial circumstances?

  • To help me understand you, can you tell me about cultural/family beliefs that might help me get a more clear sense of your life-circumstance/symptoms right now?

Spiritual

  • Can you describe your spiritual belief system?

  • Can you tell me about how you get spiritual needs met?

  • Can you tell me about your religious community?

  • Can you describe your childhood experience of religion?

Bio Psycho Social Spiritual Treatment Plan


The Bio Psycho Social Spiritual formulation can guide the treatment planning process. All treatment plans should include comment in the four areas and a rationale.

  1. Biological Treatment of current illness and associated symptoms. Medications.

  2. Psychological Individual therapy, e.g. relaxation therapy, social skills training, coping skills development. Group Therapy.

  3. Social Assistance with housing, job training, benefits groups. Encouraging hobbies, social activities, family meetings.

  4. Spiritual Utilise resources: Organized religious activities, Meditation/Mindfulness training, Groups.

Practice Approach


The following are examples of templates. Different organisations have different approaches to the BPSS (or its equivalent).




Supporting Material

(available on request)


The above templates are available in .docx form